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Scouts finish trail to Court of Honor

Eleven Islanders will become Eagle Scouts, Boy Scout’s highest award, at a Court of Honor ceremony on Jan. 11. They are from left, front row: Thomas Rall, Devlin Conway, Chris Apacible, Ryan Newell and Ethan Vu. Back row, from left: Chris Merritt, Alex Kovar, Mark Anderson, Matthew Hanson, Nolan Conway and Nathaniel Tate. All are seniors at Mercer Island High School.  - Contributed photo
Eleven Islanders will become Eagle Scouts, Boy Scout’s highest award, at a Court of Honor ceremony on Jan. 11. They are from left, front row: Thomas Rall, Devlin Conway, Chris Apacible, Ryan Newell and Ethan Vu. Back row, from left: Chris Merritt, Alex Kovar, Mark Anderson, Matthew Hanson, Nolan Conway and Nathaniel Tate. All are seniors at Mercer Island High School.
— image credit: Contributed photo

By Anna Vu

Special to the Reporter

On January 11,  eleven young men of Troop 457 from Mercer Island will celebrate achieving the rank of Eagle Scout.  The new Eagle Scouts are Mark Anderson, Chris Apacible, Devlin Conway, Nolan Conway, Matthew Hanson, Alex Kovar, Chris Merritt, Ryan Newell, Thomas Rall, Nathaniel Tate, and Ethan Vu.

They started as the Jackalope patrol in 2007.

Their Scoutmasters included: Dan Hanson, Dana Melick, Jeff Peterson, Jeff Garrett and Karl Forsgaard.

At one point, the patrol was as large as eighteen boys. Through the years, these young men have shared a love of scouting and the values of the Boy Scout law.  These young men have been on many adventures, supporting and encouraging one another.  Their journeys have included ‘High Adventure’ camps to Philmont in New Mexico and Seabase in Florida, the National Jamboree in Washington, D.C. celebrating 100 years of Scouting, Camp Grizzly, Camp Easton, Order of the Arrow ordeals, kayaking to Blake Island, building snow caves, and many backpacking trips.  This summer five of the boys organized a ten day hike of their own, and ventured through Montana.

Earning the rank of Eagle Scout is an accomplishment that less than ten percent  of Boy Scouts achieve. This required earning at least 21 merit badges, hours of volunteering, holding leadership positions within the Troop, completing an Eagle project that helps their community, and living up to the Boy Scout law.

By achieving Eagle Scout, these young men have become part of a fraternity they will share for a lifetime.

 

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