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Island receives 9/11 pieces of history

Artifacts from the World Trade Center arrived Thursday, June 26 at Fire Station 91 on the North-end of the Island. After being draped in flags and escorted by the Mercer Island Fire Department across the Washington border, a solemn ceremony was held  to welcome them to the city.  - Ross Freeman/Contributed Photo
Artifacts from the World Trade Center arrived Thursday, June 26 at Fire Station 91 on the North-end of the Island. After being draped in flags and escorted by the Mercer Island Fire Department across the Washington border, a solemn ceremony was held to welcome them to the city.
— image credit: Ross Freeman/Contributed Photo

Dozens of Islanders turned out Thursday afternoon to welcome a 9/11 artifact – a beam and chunks of a ceiling and floor from the World Trade Center – that will eventually go toward a gateway art installation at the South-end Fire Station.

Mayor Bruce Bassett was on hand to receive the artifact on behalf of the city, as well as Fire Chief Chris Tubbs, Paulette Bufano of the Arts Council, and fire personnel from the Island and other Eastside departments.

“[September 11] taught us a lot about ourselves – about our capacity to give, to look after others in the community and to work together,” said Bassett in opening remarks at a small ceremony at the North-end fire station. “These artifacts will become a tribute to those ideals and I look forward to the conversation that they will inspire here on Mercer Island.”

The Mercer Island Fire Department was the last recipient of 9/11 artifacts from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

The artifacts shipped from Brooklyn the week before last. They were escorted by Mercer Island firefighters and briefly displayed at the North-end fire station draped in American flags. They will now be transferred to artist John Sisko and architect Jim Brown.

Islanders joined fire personnel, city staff and Mayor Bruce Bassett for a small ceremony Thursday for the above artifacts from the World Trade Center. The beam and ceiling pieces made several stops at fire stations across the country on its journey to the Island (photo courtesy of Ross Freeman).

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