The north entry for the planned South Bellevue station, which will include bus and paratransit transfer facilities and a 1,500-stall parking garage. The current South Bellevue Park and Ride will close May 30. Image courtesy of Sound Transit

South Bellevue Park and Ride to close May 30

  • Friday, April 21, 2017 2:30pm
  • News

The South Bellevue Park and Ride is schedule to close May 30 to make way for construction on the Sound Transit East Link Extension.

When East Link opens in 2023, Eastside commuters will be able to travel from downtown Bellevue to downtown Seattle in 20 minutes, according to transit projections.

However, for the next five years, getting to and from a destination may involve taking two bus trips in the place of one.

There are more than 50 park and rides on the Eastside. Visit the King County Metro Park and Ride Information page to learn more about existing park and ride options.

Sound Transit has opened six new park and ride lots served by existing transit service, expanded two lots and identified lots with available parking.

Many of the new park and ride lots are closer to the trip origin, but in some cases the trip will now involve a transfer. Sound Transit will continue to explore opportunities to lease park and ride lots served by ST Route 550.

The Mercer Island City Council has expressed concerns that 550 riders will park at the Mercer Island Park and Ride when South Bellevue closes, causing the lot to fill up earlier and displacing Island commuters.

Sound Transit routes 550 and 555/556 will continue to serve stops on Bellevue Way Southeast adjacent to the South Bellevue Park and Ride site during East Link construction. These routes, as well as King County Metro Route 241, will move to new temporary bus stops during construction.

Find more information about options during East Link construction on the East Link Park and Ride Closure page at www.soundtransit.org/Rider-Guide/parking/plan-ahead-2017-park and ride-closures.

Check out maps and transportation options at www.kingcounty.gov/metro. Call 206-553-3000 to learn more about transit routes.

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