The City of Mercer Island welcome the Christian Science Reading Room to the business community

An open house and Ribbon Cutting Ceremony was held on April 30.

On April 30, The Mercer Island Chamber of Commerce welcomed the new Christian Science Reading Room to the business community and celebrated more than 80 years of continuous activity on the Island.

First opened in 1933, the Reading Room was originally in the Colonial-style church on the hill on the corner of Southeast 24th Street and 70th Southeast on the Island. In the early 1950s it was moved downtown to the Boyd Building and again to Arthur’s shopping center buildings in the 1970s. For a short while several years ago, it was also in the First Church of Christ, Scientist on Island Crest Way. The new location downtown is intended to be accessible to everyone in the community, and to those who stop in from off-island to visit the new Church and Reading Room. The First Church of Christ, Scientist on Mercer Island was relocated about a year ago.

The Reading Room has access to everything published by the Christian Science Publishing Society both on-line, and in its hard-bound collection since before 1900, as well as numerous reprints of individual articles. Bibles, copies of Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy, and Bible study aids also are available, as well as copies of the Weekly Bible Lessons, current copies of the Christian Science Monitor, biographies and current spiritual articles in the Christian Science Journal and Sentinel.

“It’s just nice to have a quiet space for study and to pray without any interruptions,” volunteer Joanne Chapa said.

The Reading Room is open to the public.

The Christian Science Reading Room is located in the same building with the church at 2864 77th Ave. SE, Mercer Island.

To learn more about the Christian Science Reading Room, go online to www.fccsmi.com.


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The Mercer Island Chamber of Commerce held a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony for the Christian Science Reading Room on April 30. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

The Mercer Island Chamber of Commerce held a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony for the Christian Science Reading Room on April 30. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

The Mercer Island Chamber of Commerce held a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony for the Christian Science Reading Room on April 30. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

The Mercer Island Chamber of Commerce held a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony for the Christian Science Reading Room on April 30. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

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