Mercer Island’s new residential code takes effect this month

  • Thursday, November 2, 2017 3:11pm
  • News

Mercer Island’s revised residential development code amendments are in effect as of Nov. 1, according to a news release from the city.

The code — adopted by the Mercer Island City Council in September — will place new limits on house size and bulk, increase tree protection, reduce construction impacts in neighborhoods and allow for far fewer deviations and variances.

The code provisions were adopted after a nearly one-year-long process launched by the Planning Commission and council to engage the community on “the changing character of Mercer Island neighborhoods” and consider potential code changes to address residents’ concerns.

The council reviewed the commission’s recommendations — along with input from the community — during seven open meetings between June and September.

City staff have been informing property owners and project applicants about the upcoming code changes over the past weeks and months. Staff remain available to address questions about how the new regulations will impact specific properties or projects. Visit the Permit Center at City Hall or call 206-275-7605 during regular business hours for assistance with these inquiries.

The city will also hold a series of information sessions at City Hall geared towards architects, builders, arborists and other building professionals to provide an overview of the new regulations, new process and impacts to projects, with plenty of time to answer questions.

The sessions will be at 4 p.m. on Nov. 30 (residential code overview), 4 p.m. on Dec. 7 (focus on trees) and 4 p.m. on Dec. 12 (another residential code overview).

Learn more at www.mercergov.org/residential.

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