Reporter publishes new letters policy | EDITORIAL

Letters policy is meant to provide direction and transparency.

  • Friday, July 26, 2019 1:30am
  • Opinion

During the coffee with the editor event I held on Mercer Island earlier this month, it was suggested that I publish a more comprehensive letters policy. It was a good idea.

And given that we’re in the thick of election season, and about to be running head first into the 2020 presidential election, it’s not a bad idea to refresh readers on our requirements for letters. This also gives us, as a newsroom, an opportunity to reaffirm how we make our decisions.

Before reading the letters policy, I would like to note what it doesn’t say.

This letters policy doesn’t say that I will make editorial decisions about letters to achieve “fairness.” Fairness is perceived, and not objective. So what do I mean by that?

First, if a letter writer voices support of an issue and uses all 300 words, that letter will run as a 300-word letter. If a letter writer voices support of an issue, but only opines for 150 words, that letter will run as a 150-word letter. Both letters were received and published.

Second, if we receive 10 letters in support of an issue and only two letters in opposition, we will run all 10 supporting letters and both opposing letters in the order that they were received. This takes the subjective decision of “fairness” out of the equation.

One last note about letters — the letters are to the editor and not to other letter writers or other readers/citizens. The letters section of the newspaper is not a forum for arguments between two people.

The newspaper issue immediately preceding an election will have no political letters. That is because there is no opportunity for rebuttal. Letters may still be published to our website to accommodate.

Our aim is to provide an opportunity for readers to submit their thoughts and opinions about coverage and other issues. In our editorial decisions, we attempt to be reasonable and transparent.

Thank you for your letters.

Letters policy

The Reporter welcomes letters to the editor.

■ Letters exceeding 300 words may be returned to the writer for revision. We strive to publish all letters.

■ All letters must have a valid signature, with a printed name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Only the name and town/community are printed.

■ We will publish only one letter per month per writer.

■ Deadline to appear in the next publication is 3 p.m. Friday. Because of the volume of letters received, not all letters are published the week they are submitted. Time-sensitive letters have priority.

■ Letters are subject to legal limitations relating to defamation and factual representation.

■ Letters should be submitted to the attention of the regional editor, Corey Morris, via email at editor@mi-reporter.com or mailed to 11630 Slater Ave. NE, Ste 8/9, Kirkland, WA 98034.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@mi-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.mi-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

[flipp]

More in Opinion

City asks residents to do their part | GUEST OPINION

A guest opinion written by Mercer Island’s elected officials.

Now is the time to be kind to each other | Windows and Mirrors

As the COVID-19 outbreak continues, it is important for us to be there for others in our communities.

Gov. Inslee is cordially invited to Kirkland, Eastside

We need the governor here to know we’re a priority, not in Olympia or on cable news channels.

Trump betrays promise to protect, fight for workers

A guest opinion syndicated by PeaceVoice.

The state has too much money and it’s a problem

With revenues rising, budget writers are going to get lots of requests on how to spend it

Short legislative session turns left

With a progressive agenda including comprehensive sex education, clean fuel standards and gun violence, Democrats will need to be cautious about overreach.

KCLS: Much to celebrate from 2019 and in the year ahead

A column from the King County Library System.

‘We can do the right thing’ | Windows and Mirrors

Clarence Moriwaki shares how we can stand up for each other and not have history repeat itself.

Clyde Ford speaks at Bellevue First United Methodist Church. One of the things he spoke about was how other countries have approached the topic of race and racism. Samantha Pak/staff photo
We need to, but how do we talk about race? | Windows and Mirrors

Racism is still an issue in this country. How can we have constructive conversations to move forward and heal?

Norman Rockwell exhibit at Covenant Living

Greg Asimakoupoulos displays magazine covers.

Teaching kindness and empathy in schools | LETTER

Kindness Matters initiative at MISD.