YamiPod and SharePod – freeing your iPod

The iPod is a most beloved device. iPod owners are able to store a large portion of their music and, in newer models, video and photo collections — within reach at all times. This allows for what most folks do with such treasures — enjoy and share them. But things are not so perfect as this feel-good phenomenon would otherwise present. Although the owner of an iPod does own the device, she or he must conform to the protocols and parameters of the iPod “system.”

  • Wednesday, November 19, 2008 9:00am
  • Life

The iPod is a most beloved device. iPod owners are able to store a large portion of their music and, in newer models, video and photo collections — within reach at all times. This allows for what most folks do with such treasures — enjoy and share them. But things are not so perfect as this feel-good phenomenon would otherwise present. Although the owner of an iPod does own the device, she or he must conform to the protocols and parameters of the iPod “system.”

The iPod has been inextricably tied to iTunes since the third generation of iPod was introduced in April 2003. Additionally, the online iTunes Store is the Web hub for purchasing media compatible with iPod. While media obtained through other means can be downloaded to and played on an iPod, only media purchased from the iTunes Store can be transferred to the iTunes software application and subsequently stored, managed and played on a personal computer. To make things even more stringent, when media purchased through the iTunes Store is copied from an iPod to a computer, it will only play on a computer that is authorized with the account used to purchase the media.

For the record, when an iPod is connected to a personal computer, iTunes is the software application that allows — and is required — to manage the audio and video collections on the iPod and the computer. While this seems to offer a nice and tidy partnering of a device and its apparently perfect counterpart, this proprietary relationship has been a source of frustration for those iPod owners who would otherwise prefer to have the freedom to expand their digital horizons beyond this so-called synergy. Subsequently, this is where iPod users draw the line.

No truer an adage than “necessity is the mother of invention” has been coined and applied to the field of technology. As such, YamiPod and SharePod have been developed and introduced as applications designed to offer frustrated iPod power-users the option to manage their media their way. As with any third-party application, there is a slightly steep learning curve and adaptation process; however, these two “freedom fighters” have earned their place in the continuum of freeware. And yes, they are free.

Both applications offer the integration of an iPod with any personal computer and without the restrictions of the iTunes environment. This does not violate any licensing agreement or adversely affect the marketplace in any way. It is merely an alternative to opening up the confined parameters of a tremendous device for those who want to experience the most from their media.

You can find these applications at www.yamipod.com/main/modules/home and www.getsharepod.com.

iTunes is a great application, but it just isn’t for everyone.

Wayne Nelson and Jeremy Self own and operate Wired Northwest LLC in Redmond. Submit your questions to: techtalk@wired-nw.com or go to www.wired-nw.com.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@mi-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.mi-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in Life

2021 Toyota Corolla XSE
Car review: 2021 Toyota Corolla XSE

By Larry Lark, contributor Hatchbacks are all about versatility and fun. The… Continue reading

2021 Mazda CX-30 Crossover
Car review: 2021 Mazda CX-30 Crossover

By Larry Lark, contributor The Mazda CX-30 Crossover made its North American… Continue reading

2021 Volkswagen Atlas Cross Sport
Car review: 2021 Volkswagen Atlas Cross Sport

By Larry Lark, contributor The Volkswagen Atlas Cross Sport full-size SUV has… Continue reading

2021 Lexus RC 350 F Sport
Car review: 2021 Lexus RC 350 F Sport

By Larry Lark, contributor The 2021 Lexus RC 350 F Sport is… Continue reading

2021 Chevrolet Trailblazer RS
Car review: 2021 Chevy Trailblazer RS

By Larry Lark, contributor Chevy’s 2021 Trailblazer is an entry-level, compact SUV… Continue reading

2022 Mini Cooper S 2-door. Courtesy photo
Car review: 2022 Mini Cooper S 2-door

By Larry Lark, contributor They don’t come around very often, but when… Continue reading

2022 Infiniti QX60 Autograph
Car review: 2022 Infiniti QX60 Autograph

By Larry Lark, contributor If you want your SUV to make a… Continue reading

2022 Telluride Nightfall Edition
Car review: 2022 Kia Telluride

By Larry Lark, contributor Big, bold and boxy, that’s the newly tweaked… Continue reading

2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Overland
Car review: 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Overland

By Larry Lark, contributor With almost 30 years and four generations under… Continue reading

2021 Honda Ridgeline AWD Sport
Car review: 2021 Honda Ridgeline AWD Sport

By Larry Lark, contributor Honda’s Ridgeline is the perfect vehicle for anyone… Continue reading

2021 Genesis GV80 Prestige
Car review: 2021 Genesis GV80 Prestige

By Larry Lark, contributor Genesis is branching out. With the introduction of… Continue reading