Community dedicates another Mercer Island school

The community dedication and open house for the new commons, gymnasium, library and classrooms at Islander Middle School was held Saturday, Oct. 1 at the school.

Islander Middle School co-principals Mary Jo Budzius and Aaron Miller and assistant principal Tara Stone cut the ribbon at the school’s dedication on Oct. 1.

The community dedication and open house for the new commons, gymnasium, library and classrooms at Islander Middle School was held Saturday, Oct. 1 at the school.

The construction at Islander Middle School provides expanded learning space to replace the 10 portable classrooms previously on site. It also provides a new commons designed to accommodate a growing student population.

The new building is 93,000 square feet and the site includes a new commons and kitchen, library, main and auxiliary gymnasiums and locker rooms, and a new entrance and administrative offices for the school. There are eight new general-purpose classrooms, two science classrooms, two special education classrooms, two shared learning areas, three music classrooms and six practice rooms.

The project began construction in the spring of 2015 and opened on schedule for the first day of school Aug. 31.

Integrus Architecture of Seattle designed the expansions to IMS. Kassel and Associates is the general contractor. Brandy Fox of CPM Seattle, Inc. managed the project for the district.

Northwood Elementary, also open for the first day of school, was dedicated on June 18.

 


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