King County Metro implements a new $2.75 fare on July 1

Riders will no longer pay additional surcharges for zones or travel during peak commute hours.

  • Friday, June 29, 2018 8:30am
  • Life

Metro’s new fare of $2.75 aims to make riding transit more convenient and avoid confusion over fare payment that leads to delays in boarding.

A single fare for adult riders also lowers the potential for fare disputes, which will help improve safety.

Metro’s fares for youth, seniors and disabled riders, and those enrolled in ORCA LIFT will not change. More information can be found on Metro’s fares page.

“A simple $2.75 flat fare makes Metro service easier to use and more accessible for hundreds of thousands of riders who depend on us every day,” Metro’s General Manager Rob Gannon said in a press release. “Just have your fare payment ready, either by ORCA card, cash or mobile ticket – no more having to think about which zone or whether you’re riding peak or off-peak.”

Metro adopted a simple fare after receiving more than 11,000 responses to two public surveys, including one in which 80 percent expressed support for a flat fare. Metro previously had one of the nation’s most complex fare structures, with one zone for the City of Seattle and another for all areas outside of the city, as well as extra charges during the morning and evening commute. Metro’s simple fare also aligns more closely with other regional transit agencies, which do not have surcharges during peak hours.

About 65 percent of Metro boardings will see no change or pay 50 cents less under the new structure. Fares for off-peak travel will increase by 25 cents – affecting about 35 percent of Metro boardings.

At the beginning of 2018, Metro increased funding for Human Services Tickets for riders with lower-income or no income. Metro also is working with ORCA agency partners to reduce the replacement card fee for ORCA LIFT customers from $5 to $3 and eliminate the $3 initial card fee for seniors and people with disabilities. Metro continues to evaluate ways to make fares easier to understand and pay.

More in Life

Mercer Island tree lot returns

The beloved holiday tradition will be in a new location this year.

Harvest Market returns Nov. 18

The event is the last one of the Mercer Island Farmers Market’s 2018 season.

Island Park kindergarteners sing “You’re a Grand Old Flag” at the school’s Veterans Day assembly on Nov. 8. Photo courtesy of Craig Degginger
Veterans Day at Island Park

Students celebrate veterans during assembly.

Dear YFS: What is alcohol-induced amnesia?

Many dangers from blacking out or passing out from too much alcohol.

Tips for preserving our family history for posterity

Write memories down before they’re lost.

OPINION: The colors of grief

Columnist reminisces on the loss of his father.

Washington National Cathedral Dean Randy Hollerith and the Rev. Greg Asimakoupoulos, full-time chaplain at Covenant Shores Retirement Community on Mercer Island.
What I learned from our nation’s pastor

Communities are already working together, we need to focus on the positive.

Islander launches sailing nonprofit

The program aims to help under-served youth apply their educational studies to the art of sailing.

Flag service available from Kiwanis Club

Flags installed and removed for seven federal holidays.

Mercer Island Kiwanis Club celebrates 58 years of service to the community

The club welcomed new leadership and new members on Oct. 16.

MIHS Band Boosters presents Band Together: “California Dreaming”

Special guest and 2010 Mercer Island High School graduate Julia Zook will speak at the event.

SJCC launches 2018/19 Arts+Ideas Season performing arts lineup

New SeaJAM cultural festival kicks off Dec. 6.