Metropolitan King County Council proclaimed February 2019 as Black History Month in King County. Delbert Richardson founder of the American History Traveling Museum received the proclamation. Photo courtesy of King County Council.

Metropolitan King County Council proclaimed February 2019 as Black History Month in King County. Delbert Richardson founder of the American History Traveling Museum received the proclamation. Photo courtesy of King County Council.

King County Council proclaims February 2019 as Black History Month

Delbert Richardson of the American History Traveling Museum receives the proclamation.

Metropolitan King County Council proclaimed February 2019 as Black History Month in King County.

Councilmember Larry Gossett presented the proclamation to Delbert Richardson at the county council’s Feb. 13 meeting.

Richardson is the founder of the American History Traveling Museum, The Unspoken Truths. The museum’s mission is to re-educate learners of all ages that leads to self-restoration and community healing, according to their website. The museum has collected an assortment of artifacts that symbolizes the African experience in the Americas and Europe.

The traveling museum was nationally recognized with a National Education Association award in 2017. Richardson said the museum uses authentic artifacts like slave shackles, a “Strange Fruit” by Billie Holiday exhibit, which has a Ku Klux Klan robe, and actual images.

Richardson asked the question, “How much have we grown, and how much more do we have to go?”

The county’s proclamation stated, “Black History month which is celebrated in the United States and Canada is a time to remember the many people, events, and contributions of African Americans historically and currently, not only in the United States but throughout the world.”

The proclamation added that the contribution of science, business, technology, law, art, entertainment and culture by African Americans in the United States has been “meaningful and beneficial to the development of our nation and other nations throughout the world.”

Black History month also has special significance to King County, as in 1986 councilmembers Bruce Laing and Ron Sims laid the foundation for renaming King County to commemorate Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

The council asked all residents to join the council in “commemorating the countless contributions of African Americans to our nation and the world not only during this month but every opportunity throughout the year.”

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